Le Principe du plaisir | Expositions


RENE MAGRITTE

“Le Principe du plaisir”  ‘The Pleasure Principle”

TATE LIVERPOOL, June – 16 October 2011,

Text by Julija Kolmogorova

 

 

 

“(My paintings) evoke mystery and, indeed, when one sees one of my pictures, one asks oneself this simple question, ‘What does that mean?’. It does not mean anything, because mystery means nothing either. It is unknowable.” – Rene Magritte

“Mes peintures évoquent le mystère et il est vrai que quand on voit l’une de mes oeuvres, on se demande simplement “Qu’est ce que ça veut dire?”. Ca ne veut rien dire, parce que le mystère ne veut rien dire non plus. Il est inconnaissable.” Rene Magritte

 


This summer, Tate Liverpool presents ‘Rene Magritte: The Pleasure Principle,’ a highly anticipated exhibition of one of the geniuses of 20th Century surrealism. The Belgian artist took non-descript objects and set them in an extraordinary context or displayed them from unfamiliar angles, creating work which was humorous, baffling, clever, and mysterious. Magritte himself was quite aware of the effect his paintings had on viewers stating, “They evoke mystery and, indeed, when one sees one of my pictures, one asks oneself this simple question, ‘What does that mean?’. It does not mean anything, because mystery means nothing either. It is unknowable.” ‘The Pleasure Principle’ consists of more than 100 pieces of artwork some of which provide a rare insight into the artist’s life, drawing back the curtain on his personal and artistic relationships. The exhibition also features out-of-the-ordinary photographs, video footage, early commercial designs and erotic works, as well as some of his most famous paintings such as The Tomb of Wrestlers (1960), The Listening Room (1958).

 

IMAGES:

René Magritte, The Listening Room, 1958. Oil on Canvas. Kunsthaus Zürich, Walter Harfner Donation. © Charly Herscovici, c/o ADAGP, Paris, 2011

René Magritte, The Tomb of Wrestlers, 1960. Oil on Canvas. Private Collection. © Charly Herscovici, c/o ADAGP, Paris, 2011

René Magritte, Time Transfixed, 1938. The Art Institute of Chicago. © Charly Herscovici, c/o ADAGP, Paris 2011

René Magritte, The Dominion of Light, 1953. Private Collection, Guggenheim, Asher Associates. © Charly Herscovici, c/o ADAGP, Paris, 2011